Hen Harrier

The Birder's Market | Resource | Bird news for Britain / Rest of the World | UK Bird News | Bird News for United Kingdom 2006  | Bird News for Scotland 2006 |  Hen Harrier

Hen Harrier

Hen Harrier

Hen Harrier
Numbers of hen harriers on RSPB reserves have almost doubled since 1999. RSPB nature reserves provide secure areas for hen harriers to nest, with average productivity almost double that on grouse moors in Scotland and England. The birds simply need a varied heather and grass structure, with long heather for nesting and shorter grassy vegetation full of voles and meadow pipits as food.
Illegal interference of hen harriers is considered the number one wildlife crime by the police and government. Advocacy by the RSPB is helping to ensure that strong legal protection is maintained for hen harriers, and that action to reduce the conflict with managers of driven grouse shoots is approached in a measured and scientifically rigorous way that does not further threaten the species' conservation status.

The scale of illegal killing has prompted a range of initiatives by the government, police and statutory conservation agencies, including Operation Artemis (a police crackdown on hen harrier destruction) and English Nature's Hen Harrier Recovery Project.
The prospects for the hen harrier are mixed, in the short-term at least. In the west of the UK, where there is little driven grouse-shooting and fewer sheep, the prospects are better than for several decades.
Populations in Wales, Northern Ireland, the Isle of Man and some of the Hebrides are at their highest since the 1970s. In 2004, there were 749 nesting pairs in the UK, a 44% increase in just six years. New agri-environment schemes provide an even greater opportunity for land managers to help upland wildlife, including hen harriers.

However, numbers in England and south and east Scotland, where driven grouse shooting is a major land use, have fallen. An end to persecution would allow the population to rise by an estimated 13% each year. For hen harrier numbers to recover in these areas, moorland managers need to consider whether driven grouse shooting can only be sustained by killing rare and protected birds.

In the longer term, climate change could have a major impact on upland birds and grouse shooting. However, the hen harrier may prove more adaptive than many other species, as it is equally at home in grassland.
Click here for books about this species

Management Trial to reduce Hen Harrier predation

Management Trial to reduce Hen Harrier predation on Red Grouse at Langholm in 1998 and 1999: the effect of providing hen harriers with supplementary food.Free online PDF publication from Scottish Natural Heritage Click here for further details....

The Birder's Market | Resource | Bird news for Britain / Rest of the World | UK Bird News | Bird News for United Kingdom 2006  | Bird News for Scotland 2006 |  Hen Harrier

add this

RSPB

RSPB GIFT MEMBERSHIP

RSPB GIFT MEMBERSHIP


celestron
Foto

Foto

Today' Best Deals
Lizard Bird Diary

Lizard Bird Diary

d






Compact Mini Rubber 8 x 21 Kids Binoculars

BTO

abebooks

Rare & Collectible Books at AbeBooks.com

Information Pages

Valid CSS!