World Bird News July 2014

The Birder's Market | Resource | Bird news for Britain / Rest of the World | World Bird News | World Bird News 2014 |  World Bird News July 2014

Decebal and Darko’s journey across Europe: our Red-breasted Geese successfully reached Siberia!

Decebal and Darko’s journey across Europe: our Red-breasted Geese successfully reached Siberia!

By Elodie Cantaloube, Fri, 25/07/2014 - 13:38

Let me introduce you to Decebal and Darkos, two special Red-breasted Geese that were selected by SOR (BirdLife in Romania) to carry a satellite transmitter to provide conservationists with information on their migratory journey.

Red-breasted Goose, is a distinct red, black and white bird that breeds in the Taymyr Peninsula of Siberia and is one of the most beautiful geese in the world. It’s also one of the rarest species of geese, and has a small, rapidly declining population. It’s threatened by illegal killing along its migration route and by changes to habitats and is listed as Endangered by BirdLife on behalf of the IUCN Red List.

SOR has been working intensively to protect this species. The project “Save Ground for Redbreasts” aims to increase our knowledge of the route the geese take from the wintering areas in Bulgaria and Romania to the breeding grounds in Arctic, through satellite-tracking of a pair of geese: Decebal and Darko. The two adult male red-breasted geese were tagged with satellite transmitters, after being caught in mid- February 2014, near Durankulak Lake (Bulgaria).

Fortunately, Decebal reached Siberia on the 14 of June, 95 days after his departure. The goose arrived at his breeding grounds in the vicinity of Lake Kuchumka, 8922 kilometres away from his departure point.

The birds’ beautiful journey through Europe up to the northern part of Eurasia can be followed in this website, where SOR/BirdLife Romania uploads every 2-3 days his new positions.

One tenth of bird species flying under the conservation radar

One tenth of bird species flying under the conservation radar

By Martin Fowlie, Thu, 24/07/2014 - 00:10

More than 350 newly recognised bird species have been assessed by BirdLife International for the first time on behalf of The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™. Worryingly, more than 25% of these newly recognised birds have been listed as threatened on The IUCN Red List - compared with 13% of all birds - making them urgent priorities for conservation action.

The first of a two-part comprehensive taxonomic review has focussed on non-passerine birds – such as birds of prey, seabirds, waterbirds and owls – and has led to the recognition of 361 new species, that were previously treated as ‘races’ of other forms. The new total of 4,472 non-passerines implies that previous classifications have undersold avian diversity at the species level by more than 10%.

“Put another way, one tenth of the world’s bird species have been flying below the conservation radar”, said Dr Stuart Butchart, BirdLife’s Head of Science.

Species such as Belem Curassow Crax pinima from Brazil and Desertas Petrel Pterodroma deserta from Madeira have been listed as Globally Threatened. In the case of the Blue-bearded Helmetcrest Oxypogon cyanolaemus, a beautiful hummingbird from Colombia, it may already be too late, as the species has not been seen for nearly 70 years.

The new criteria for determining which taxa qualify as species have created a level playing field, by which all bird species can be assessed equally. They also bring an added precision to help us shine a light on the places most important for birds, nature and people – the areas of the planet that we need to urgently protect and save.

Until now, only one species of Ostrich had been recognised and was assessed as Least Concern on The IUCN Red List. However, Somali Ostrich Struthio molybdophanes, which is found in Somalia, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Kenya, is now recognised as a distinct species and listed as Vulnerable. Its population is thought to be in rapid decline because of hunting, egg-collecting and persecution, and its status could worsen if action is not taken soon.

“This species highlights both the need for improved knowledge of the world’s birds and the need for conservation action in some of the most challenging parts of the globe”, said Andy Symes, BirdLife’s Global Species Officer.
“The latest reassessment of birds for The IUCN Red List highlights the importance of taxonomic review in accurately identifying the conservation status of species, as well as those areas which require priority conservation action,” says Jane Smart, Global Director, IUCN Biodiversity Conservation Group. “Thanks to the ongoing assessment work of BirdLife, the early recognition of those threatened species such as the Somali Ostrich should result in timely targeted action to safeguard the species and protect important sites.”

As well as assessing newly recognised species, the 2014 Red List also re-assesses the status of some existing species. The colourful Bugun Liocichla Liocichla bugunorum is known from only three small areas in the Himalayas of eastern India, where just a few pairs have been located. Following the recent construction of a road through its habitat, and damage caused by uncontrolled fires, the species has been re-classified as Critically Endangered. Thanks to successful conservation efforts, Bearded Vulture Gypaetus barbatus is recovering in Europe, but globally it is declining because of poisoning, disturbance and collisions with powerlines, resulting in it being assessed as Near Threatened rather than Least Concern.

The 2014 assessment also raises the importance of several threatened bird hotspots. Many of the newly recognised species are found in South-East Asia, where biodiversity is highly threatened. Parts of this region have already been identified as globally important areas of endemism (holding many species that occur nowhere else on Earth). Some have now been shown to host even more unique species than previously thought, including the Indonesian islands of Talaud and Sangihe and parts of the Philippine archipelago, such as the island of Cebu.

These areas need immediate conservation attention to protect the remaining habitat and safeguard the future of Critically Endangered birds such as Sangihe Dwarf-kingfisher Ceyx sangirensis and Cebu Brown-dove Phapitreron frontalis – neither of which have been recorded recently, but both could still be clinging on in small numbers.

There are also some worrying implications for conservation on the Indonesian island of Java. Newly recognised species such as Javan Flameback Chrysocolaptes strictus, a species of woodpecker classified as Vulnerable, and Javan Blue-banded Kingfisher Alcedo euryzona which enters The IUCN Red List as Critically Endangered, show how the island has evolved many distinct species. However, Java’s very high human population density and increasing rates of development and encroachment are impacting the conservation status of these endemic species, which are now threatened with extinction.

“The IUCN Red List is crucial not only for helping to identify those species needing targeted recovery efforts, but also for focussing the conservation agenda by identifying the key sites and habitats that need to be saved, including Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas”, said Butchart. “The updated 2014 Red List for birds will help set future conservation and funding priorities.”

Serbian Saker decreasing despite intense efforts

By Elodie Cantaloube, Thu, 10/07/2014 - 09:04

Pigeon breeders, farmers, poachers and strong winds: the many threats to the rare Falcon.

Fourteen, maybe seventeen pairs: that’s all that remains of the rare and beautiful Saker Falcon in Serbia. Estimated at some 55 pairs in 2007, the population has dramatically decreased according to the data gathered by the Bird Protection and Study Society of Serbia (BPSSS; BirdLife Partner).

Just like in other Central and Eastern European countries, Saker Falcons tend to breed on high-voltage electricity pylons, mostly in the Pannonian area of Serbia, an intensively cultivated open land, densely inhabited. Saker Falcons tend to occupy the nests of Common Ravens and Carrion Crows on the pylons, which make them vulnerable to a large number of threats.

According to Draženko Rajkovic', head of the Saker Conservation Programme at BPSSS, the biggest threats these birds are facing are nest destruction, killing of adult Sakers and stealing of chicks from the nests. These human pressures add to natural causes, such as the destruction of nests by strong winds and rain.

The Saker Conservation Programme started seven years ago and began a number of actions aimed at solving the problems, "Following the succesful installations of artificial nests in neighbouring Hungary, which led to a stabilisation of the Saker Falcon population in the country, we decided to consult with MME-BirdLife Hungary on how to proceed. The first wooden trays were installed in 2006, and by 2008 we had installed 100 of them with the financial support of the Government of the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina. The first pair of Saker started breeding in the wooden trays in 2013, and until now an additional two have accepted such nests", says Rajkovic'.

The efforts to provide safe nesting to Saker Falconss is still ongoing. Recently 30 metal boxes with a roof were installed on pylons with the key logistical support of Elektromreža Srbije Public Enterprise (EMS), a state-owned company that maintains a high-voltage distribution system.

BPSSS Secretary Marko Tucakov stressed the importance of the role played by EMS in this conservation effort: “There is no state company nor governmental institution with whom we have achieved such a high level of understanding and collaboration, to the extent that they have asked us to organise educational workhops with EMS workers, who have effectively become responsible for the future of the Saker population».

Sadly, despite all efforts being made to preserve the life of this species, BPSSS still asseses their conservation status in Serbia as “very unfavorable”. The main reason for this, according to conservationists, is pigeon breeding, especially of the races meant for fast flying and orientation contests. Conservationists blame criminals among the pigeon breeding community for being responsible of the intentional killing of adults and the destruction of their nests, since the majority of the Serbian Sakers are extensively preying domestic raised pigeons during the breeding period. Serbian ornithologists therefore call on the inspectors, the police and the prosecutors to take urgent actions to stop this acute threat to the already critically small Serbian Saker population.

The Birder's Market | Resource | Bird news for Britain / Rest of the World | World Bird News | World Bird News 2014 |  World Bird News July 2014

add this

RSPB

RSPB GIFT MEMBERSHIP

RSPB GIFT MEMBERSHIP


celestron
Foto

Foto

Today' Best Deals
Lizard Bird Diary

Lizard Bird Diary

d





Compact Mini Rubber 8 x 21 Kids Binoculars

BTO

Valid CSS!